Draw This Again! Murkrow Gijinka – Drawing With Jerin Episode #10

Draw This Again! Murkrow Gijinka – Drawing With Jerin Episode #10


[BEEPING] [INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC] ERIN: Hello, YouTube. Today on Drawing With
Jerin, we’re gonna be revisiting some old artwork from 2009 to see what
a decade of experience looks like. JERAMI: So I guess we can talk about progress–
E: Progress. J: –and what it feels like to see how much
you’ve improved over time. E: Or not improved, in my case.
J: What’s that supposed to mean?
E: What’s that look supposed to mean? J: You don’t think you’ve improved?
E: A little. J: Erin, give yourself more credit. Come on, man.
E: Do I have to? J: You do.
E: [DEEP BREATH] J: You need to be good to yourself.
E: Do I, though? J: You do.
E: Do I really?
J: Yes. E: Must I?
J: Yes. E: I must?
J: You must.
E: I gotta? J: One of the things, I think, that surprised me
the most when we started working on redoing some of these old pictures
was then, as proud as I was when I did it the first time, going back and
then seeing it again as something to work on, and realizing how not actually good it was.
E: [LAUGHING] Yeah, I’ve had that feeling. Like, I
thought it was good when I made it, but then I went back to it and I was like,
“Oh god, that face is so jacked.” But there were other times when
I actually felt, “Well, this kind of just feels like a rough sketch of what I
want it to look like. I don’t really have the skill to do what I actually want yet.”
That happened a lot when I started doing digital art, which was about, like, twelve
years ago that I got my first tablet? I was pretty much used to doing things in
traditional media, which–I wasn’t super good at that, but I was more used to it.
You know, I had to learn how to control the … everything, and figure out how I was
gonna color things, and a lot of times I just used flat vectors. And I wasn’t really
good at that in the beginning, so everything kind of just looked like a
cut paper collage that was a stand-in for what I wanted to make, which
was something much more detailed. I would think of things like, “You know, if I
had more time and patience to do this background, or if I could shade things well enough ….”
And once I had that experience, then I went back and I did the background and
the shading and all that. But the first time, it was just like, “Ugh, this is so hard.
I’m just gonna make this really basic.” Hence all the vectors.
J: Or just, like, a gradient. E: A gradient, yeah.
J: [LAUGHING]
E: Oh, gradients. Gradients–where would we be without them?
J: I did gradients all the time. E: I still like gradients, but in moderation. J: This is why I really like doing
these kinds of projects, where you go back and try to redo something that
you’ve done before, because that’s where you really see the big difference. The
bigger the time gap between the last piece you did and the one you’re doing
now, the more impressive the differences are, and the more you can see that progress. E: And, you know, sometimes it doesn’t even take that
long. When I was redoing a lot of my old fan art at the beginning of the year, I felt like I had
improved a lot while I was working on it. And then I did that big piece that you’re
editing, that other one. I finished that, and I was like, “Well, this didn’t come
out as good as I wanted. It’s not as good as some of the other art that I
redid recently.” And then I looked at the stuff that I redid, and the stuff that I
redid was crappier than the thing that I had just done, and I was like, “Oh, OK,
I guess I just suck.” [LAUGHING] But it was actually ’cause I– my standards had
gotten higher. And my skills were not quite there yet. But every time you do something,
you get higher standards for how it should be. J: Now the one thing that anybody
who’s ever drawn anything before will know is that when you draw
something, and you know it’s not right, there’s something wrong with it, but you
can’t quite put your finger on what it is– E: That’s–
J: –or what you need to fix to make it
better. Doing this particular exercise, especially with these older
character drawings, I immediately saw, “This is really, really wrong.” But unlike last time,
now a lot of the things that I needed to change to make it look right were
obvious. And I’m not gonna say it’s perfect yet, ’cause I’m sure I’m gonna
come back to these drawings in another 10 years and be like, “Oh god, what was I thinking?”
E: [LAUGHING] J: There were things that I saw in these pieces that were just instant, like, “I know exactly what to do to fix this.” Everything that I had in mind when I
first came up with that drawing–I had all these ideas for stuff I wanted to do,
and what I ended up with was a result of my limitations. But this time, looking at
it and seeing everything that needed to be fixed and knowing exactly what
to do, it was almost kind of fun. E: A lot of artists–a lot of creative people, myself
included–are always comparing ourselves to someone else who is better, and
there’s always going to be someone who’s ridiculously good. And you’re like, “Well,
this person is good, so why should I even try?” But you don’t want to compare
yourself to those people, because you’re comparing two completely different
people who have completely different life experiences and all that other fun stuff.
Compare yourself to your past self and how much you’ve improved.
J: Uh, my perspective, these characters that I drew, as bad as that looked, I was really–
E: They’re not bad. J: No, I’m talking about the originals.
E: Yeah, no, wasn’t bad. J: No, they were bad.
E: You were learning. They were good.
You were learning. J: As bad as those looked,
I was super, super proud of what I had accomplished back then,
but I think this should be a clear indication that no matter how good
you think you are, there is always, always room to get better. My main
piece of advice is just be patient. E: Yeah, you gotta have patience with
yourself, man. That’s the most important thing. J: It takes the time it takes, and sometimes
it’s a really long time. Sometimes it’s a lifetime. You’re never done. You can always be
better. It’s absolutely true that the more you learn about a thing, the more you
realize there is to learn about a thing. The greatest experts in the world have the
most questions, probably, out of any of us. E: Yeah, the more you know, the
more you know you don’t know.
J: The more you want to know.

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