How to Charge Clients for Freelance Web Design

How to Charge Clients for Freelance Web Design



what's up everyone GERD here from Cove the web and in this video we're going to talk about freelance and how to charge people okay so you've been learning about Web Design you think that you're at the point where you can start to broaden your horizons and start to go out and actually create websites for other people in exchange for some cold hard cash the only thing keeping you from doing that is that you've got a pretty big problem how much do you charge them alright so there's two ways you can go about this you can either charge a fixed price which is what I did when I first got started or you can charge it by the hour price which is in sometimes a more common approach and it can lead to more money but a fixed price will most likely sell you more websites so when I first started I did a fixed package actually gave them two options the first one was the starter package which was $600 and that got them a template design of course the templates that I had set up all looked very nice and when I offered them it was of course I would change the template to match their colors their logo and he thought that they wanted to be changed things like that and I would of course put all their content in their company information on it but it was a very very simple thing I had a contract that I would give them and they would go we would go over the contract together we would not would make sure that they knew what they were going to be getting and what I did was I offered them like three revisions after I show them the initial site the reason I did that was because when if you don't have like a contract in place or you don't specifically outline what you're going to be offering them you can actually kind of get screwed out of your time which is really the most important thing that you can lose or gain obviously the money is nice but you don't want to be doing $600 for a website and you maybe spend you know 20 hours on it or 30 hours on it because that's just not really worth it I mean yeah it's you're not really gonna you're not going to get to the point where you're below minimum wage but the idea is that you're making above minimum wage you always you know as I see it I always want to be making above minimum wage that was always my goal would be to be making above the set 25 or whatever it is that you have here in the States for the $600 I would offer them a certain amount of time I think it was like six hours or 10 hours or something like that and always I would make about a hundred two or you know fifty to a hundred dollars an hour when you break it down but I kind of outlined how much time I was going to be putting into it and the things that I would what I was giving them would keep me under that in that timeframe and the same thing for my more expensive pro package which was a custom design I would spend about twelve hours on it and it was like $1000 or something like that the other way you can do this is you can charge by the hour which is a more common approach I think and it's working more traditional definitely and you can make a lot more money off of it depending on what you charge when you first started out maybe you're charged $10 an hour 15 dollars an hour $20 an hour and I've met people that charge all the way up to three and four hundred dollars an hour and think about it that's a lot a lot of money and not only that but they'll say I'll charge $300 an hour and they'll also have let's say like a ten hour minimum so right there than making at least three grand and that's to make it worth them because those are the people that have been doing it for a while and just have a lot of different clients so they need to make sure that everything is going to be worth their time so I hope you learned something from this video I hope you guys enjoyed this if you did definitely subscribe we've got another video coming out tomorrow it's actually the next video in the website design from start to finish series and it's going to be fun so stay tuned and I'll see you guys tomorrow peace

31 thoughts on “How to Charge Clients for Freelance Web Design”

  1. So theoretically you could realistically make 30,000 bucks a month if you have your management system organized and orders lined up. (given you have no kids and no familial obligations)

  2. Good video.

    If I may make a suggestion, do NOT build sites for churches. I am a Christian and would love to use my web development talents to help churches, but they are the WORST clients you will ever find. I have had experiences building sites for four churches, and each of them turned out to be a major headache.

    First, everything you propose will have to go through a committee. The pastor cannot make the decisions without the board approving. BUT, there is ALWAYS someone on the board who wants to keep the site development in-house, and they will work behind the scenes to wrestle the project away from you – even after publication. It seems that the church site is somehow a focal point of power and there are always people in the church who want that power for themselves.

    Next, there are always people within the church who want funds for pet projects, which does not include paying you. Payments will be uncertain, and you are not guaranteed to get all of your development fee if you allow payments.

    I love God, and love His people. Unfortunately, the internal politics of churches make them undesirable web clients. I will NEVER accept another church client, no matter how shinny that apple may be.

  3. how the hell do you make a decent website for 600 dollars in 6 hours? Do you just copy and paste your template and fill in the info? if so, wouldn't all your websites look the same? does it matter? sorry for all the questions. I'm just trying to start out

  4. I'm actually looking to start a website for this vision Ive had for a while but was told I need someone with at least 5 year's server experience to do my site..and my other issue is how do I got about it being a passion project that has little $ to put in initially but will cut the developer in on a pre worked out percentage of the website earnings once up and running? how do I present this to a developer? and is this situation common? and if so can you give me some examples?;)

  5. the issue I have is I spend too much time 'focusing 100% on learning' when I can actually find real work which would build portfolio as well as experience and bringing in a little cash. I've actually turned good work down because of underconfidence that I need to learn more.

    I'm confident enough in front end and I love Jekyll fo static stuff, learning wordpress theming, but also want to knuckle down and better understand sql object oriented php frameworks, JavaScript frameworks, gulp yada yada yada

  6. Hello and first of all, thanks for all the really helpful tutorials you made!

    How to you actually sell your clients the websites/design you make?
    Do you just give them your html and css/jquery/bootstrap etc. file?? (sorry this might seem to be a stupid question^^)
    and who actually hosts the website, do you deal with the hosting or do your clients manage this by themselves.

    And do you ever work with CMS's?

  7. I've heard people charge a fixed price per page. e.g. $400 per page, so if the the website contains 5 pages that is $400.00×5. does that seem reasonable?

  8. Man, If I quoted $300 per hour, I'd get chased out of the building! I've always done fixed prices, but theoretically based on an hourly rate…I kinda eyeball it, and guestimate how long it will take. 

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