How to draw LIONS – Mink’s Tutorials

How to draw LIONS – Mink’s Tutorials


Hey there, and welcome to my tutorial about
how to draw lions! They are by far the most social cats, and the adult males are especially famous
for their majestic manes. Beautiful animals to draw~ I have three fairly different drawings of
lions prepared, portraying males, females and playful cubs! So let me start showing you how to draw them! Thank you~ First of all we are going to draw the very
basic skeletal structure, starting with the head. Of course it is up to you with which body
part you start with, but I simply choose to start with the head. We draw an oval shape that is fairly long,
like so. And also tilted by 45°, roughly. The reason is: when cats look straight forward, they simply have their skull orientated that
way. We draw the center lines too, which are helpful to get the details and positions
right, and also the general orientation of the head. Over here too, we half it. And when we look at the shape directly from
the front it would simply look like a circle. Another thing we need to do is… draw a line from this point here, and it* has a very small angle to the center
line. And this is going to be where the eyes will
end up at. Slightly above this intersection we drop in
a triangle shape for the nose, which is fairly large, and also slightly stretched
to the sides. Draw a small line downwards, and then form
an upside-down Y shape, that has a slight curvature too. And draw these round shapes for the cheeks. They are still connected with the corners
of the triangle, like so. And then the chin, which actually is drawn
over the oval shape. We don’t perfectly stay inside, but here and there we subtract a little bit
from it, like over here, or we add some, like over here around the
forehead. To draw the nose bridge at first curve around
just slightly, and then draw a straight line, until we get
in touch with this eye line. And the same on the other side too. And these will be the positions of the eyes. An optional thing you can do is, from the
inner eye corner you draw this line here, this curve, going around, which is helpful for getting the overall shape
of the face correct. As for the ears, we draw these lines that
are almost parallel to the center line. They diverge just slightly. And all the way back here we have the inner
ear corners. Draw at first a straight line, and then curve
around. Their ears are very round. And leave a small gap. We don’t completely touch the oval shape. And here will be a slight corner. The other ear points away from us, and therefore
we see the backside. It forms kind of a triangular shape, and is
slightly angled. It is not straight up, like so. Let’s move on to the rest of the body, starting
with the neck, which starts at the bottom back of the head. This lion is supposed to be attentive, and therefore has his head slightly raised. He is standing straight up, and we’re looking
at him from the side. So here we have the shoulder, and we are gonna
continue with the spine. It can have a slight curvature, and the length will be about 2.5 times the
head length. So about this length here. It doesn’t have to be super exact. The head length, which is slightly more, since we are looking at his head from the
side, is our general length unit in order to compare
all the body parts. I’m drawing the shoulder blades, which are able to move independently from
each other, and therefore we have two lines. They’re shorter than the head length, and
also by the way the neck is shorter too. And when a lion is standing straight with
its front legs, therefore the feet are right under the shoulders, the shoulder blades are going to be angled
forwards, while the upper leg bones are gonna be angled
backwards, right back below the shoulders. And this will make the chest appear like it’s
sticking out. The length of this bone here is slightly longer
than the shoulder blades, but still shorter than the head length. And then we are gonna go ahead and draw the
lower leg, which is about the same length. Here we have the ankle, and then this middle
part of the foot. And here we drop in the paw, which I just simplify as a simple line and
we care about the details later. The same thing for the other leg too. Just one thing I have to keep in mind is the
perspective. So the back is supposed to be our eye level, and therefore the feet are gonna be apart
a distance. Another optional thing you can do is to sketch
in the rib cage, that is curving from the knees all the way
up towards the spine, the middle of the spine. It is not mandatory, but can be helpful in order to get the shape
of the overall body right. As for the back legs, I draw the hip, which curves to the back. The thing about the hip is that it’s a singular
bone, and therefore it cannot move its two sides
independently from each other. And the general width of the shoulders and
hip, if you look at the skeleton from above, is not all that wide. Now, what you can do, if you already know
where the ground level is, and you already know where you want to have
your feet at, then you can simply draw your feet at first, and then work yourself upwards. So I draw this line from the hip, and this side I’m gonna have this foot further
at the back, and the other one, that is further away from
us, slightly to the front, like so. Then the bones connected to the ankles are
gonna be slightly longer, than compared to the front legs, and the angle of these is predefined, because it depends on where the foot is standing
in relation to the hip. If it’s further at the front this angle here
will be smaller, while this bone here is more vertical. The ankles will leave a little bit of the
bones sticking out. And the rest is a simple matter of connecting
the dots. Both the upper and lower leg are about the
same length as the head. And while the lion is standing straight up the legs are mostly stretched out. Not all the way, but mostly. And there we go, we can just guess the positions and it will be mostly right. Last but not least, the tail of course, which is just here continuing the curvature
of the spine downwards, like so. At least that is the case, when it is relaxed. And often it has this curvature going back
up again. And the length of the tail is about 2-2.5
times the head length. So very similar to the spine. In order to show you good looking and more accurate results, I also have the in-between steps prepared
beforehand. And so let’s continue by adding more details. Again, with what you start is up to you. I like to start with the nose, and here we
have two curves, going into the middle and forming this kind
of curved Y shape. We have a small distance, and then we create
this corner, going all the way up, until we almost touch
the upper edge of this triangle, curve around and form this sort of S shape, until we connect with the corner of the triangle. We make everything dark in-between, and this shade also continues all the way
up here, because there is still a small gap. The same on the other side, but much narrower,
like so. And don’t forget the line here in the middle. The upper edge starts between the nostril and
this corner here, and is formed like a slight wave, like here. And the distance between it and the nostrils is very narrow, sometimes it’s basically non-existent. Let’s continue with the mouth, and this time we can add even more curvature
if you want to. And also have this dark spot, in case we want
to slightly show some lips. Here I just mostly follow the curves that
we already drew before, but here I stop, make some slight indications
of the cheek shape, and down here I have this dark spot, which is fairly common among big cats. It curves all the way down the jaw. The chin slightly curves inwards, and then we mostly follow the shape from before. We draw the nose bridge on this side, but here on this side we mostly leave it open. Let’s form the face a little bit, over here. To draw the eyes what you can do is start with the upper lid. Its shape will depend on it’s mood. If it’s like wide awake and has its eyes wide
open, or if it’s more relaxed. Then it will be a bit flatter. Here I just want to have it slightly curved, and also we drop in the actual eye, which is a circle cut off by the upper lid. The pupil is round, unlike smaller cats, and the lower lid is basically like an outline, curves inwards like so, and we also have this
dark area that curves inwards, so therefore it reaches
over this line from the nose bridge. Some extra details here on the other side,
and then we have the eye. We basically do the same thing on the other
side, but it is hidden behind the nose bridge, and therefore we can barely see it. You can also add some extra detail, like here this kind of notch right along the
middle of the forehead. Or this kind of L shape, with two sides that point towards the corner here of the
eye, and the nose corner. Or maybe a little bit here behind the eyes. Let’s not forget about the whiskers. So here we have these rows, three rows of
dots, right underneath the nostril, that mostly follow the curvature of the cheeks. Here and there can be some extra dots however. And then we draw the whiskers themselves. In a relaxed state they’re mostly just hanging
down, although some of them will also curve upwards. A few of them even can be kind of squiggly. Maybe it got messed up during playtime, hmm. Let’s continue by sketching in the mane itself. At first I’m gonna let the forehead continue
to the back, and then draw short lines for the base of
the mane. At first it’s gonna have fairly short hair, and you have this round outline, and right below the ears we have the hair
going longer and longer and follow this downwards curve, like so. Then I draw these hair right in front of the
ear. Of the left ear. And go to the back like so. Although the orientation of the hair could
be different. And the hair is so long that it even shows
up on the other side. And also I want it to be in front of this
ear and stretch down like so. There can be a few long hairs of the ear itself, and a darker spot where the ear becomes deeper. Before we continue with the mane we need to
sketch out the rest of the body. I like to start with the feet, and for those I’m just sketching out these
flat oval shapes, like so. Here some indications of the toes, but I don’t really add much more detail. At least for this position here, because when
they are just standing the feet just look very simple. Now i construct the legs, by having these
individual segments that get wider and wider as we climb upwards. Lions are also fairly muscular. Not as muscular as tigers for example, but still we have to make sure that the legs
are fairly broad and strong looking. All the way up until we get to the shoulders. And the shoulders can stick out quite significantly, especially if the weight is focused on just
one of the legs. I went ahead and sketched out the other leg
too. It’s not that different, and also I did not
draw it fully, because this part will be hidden by the torso. Something you shouldn’t forget however is
that the front legs additionally have the carpal pads right at
the back, slightly below the ankles, and the dew claws, which are at the inner
side of the foot and are basically like our thumbs. Now the back legs, starting with the feet
again. Nothing really different about this here. Just once again a flat oval shape with the
indications of toes. And then we draw this kind of long shape all
the way around. And here at first we are curving up, around
the knee, and then you can imagine a circle, sitting
right here. We curve around it, and form this S shape,
like so. And therefore form this corner right at the
ankle. The rest is fairly simple. Just as usual. All the way up, until we get to the hip, like
so. I did the same for the other side, and what we need to make sure is, that this here is not a corner, but a continuous
line. The neck is just simply a connection between the top of the head and the shoulders. And also the chest, which goes all the way
up behind the jaw. We have the shoulder here, curving down, until we reconnect with the curvature of the
spine. There can be a slight hill around here where
the hip is located. And from this top we have a slight downwards
slope. It is not horizontal. It curves down ever so slightly, until we transition over to the tail. The base of the tail is fairly wide, but then it gets more and more narrow. Follow the curvature from the sketch before, and here I want to make sure the width gets
smaller. And their tail is not fluffy at all, except
for the tip. We have a little tuft, which you can draw (Let me move a little bit) by at first having almost kind of a circular
shape at the base and then on one side we create this S curve, while on the other side you simply continue
the curve from before. And we have this kind of flame shape. Now that of course is not the only kind of
shape that this tuft can form, but it is a fairly simple and easy one to
do. As for the chest and belly, at first we just simply follow the curvature
of the rib cage. There can be a line going up here and have
a slight corner. And the belly of course depends on how well
few the lion is. So it curve up like so and … uhh that doesn’t
look healthy. Or, hmm, maybe had a bit too much. But in a normal state it would sag just slightly
downwards, like so. And here I want to have a curve coming from
the knee, and be in front of the stomach right here. Alright now it is time to continue the mane. Over here we’re gonna draw these long hairs, all the way until the back. And the hair gets shorter and shorter. And on this side I also want to have very
very long hair that hangs down until we get in between the legs. They can also have a little tuft right here
at the front knee. It depends on the lion sub-species. Speaking of, the size of the mane first of
all depends on the age of course, but also on the sub-species. Some manes just simply end right where the
shoulder begins. But some of them reach over the shoulders, and don’t just end in between the legs, but
cover the whole belly. We’re going to go a mid way, and therefore
just cover half of the shoulders. Curving down like so, until we connect with
the other side. Here and there you can add some extra details, like the shape of the rib cage, or here the
ankles of the back legs. Once again I have the in-between step prepared
beforehand, and it looks much nicer in my opinion. And this is the finished version, fully outlined
and colored. As always, the style you draw your lion in
is up to you, so I’m not going to explain too many details. Well, let me turn off the shading, so I can show you the coloration of the fur. They have white or almost white fur on the
belly, the mouth, chin, the upper edge of the nose, around the eyes, the inner sides of the legs
and the toes. The rest of the body is basically light or
medium light brown, with the back and some features in the face
being slightly darker. The mane is darker than the rest of the fur, and depending on the kind of lion, can have a gradient to a very dark brown. Also, go ahead and use shades and light to
indicate the shape of the muscles and bones underneath the skin. Ok, let us move on to the next lion drawing. The second pose is going to have much more
action in it! And while the timelapse of its making-of process
runs, I’m going to tell you some interesting facts
about lions. As I stated at the beginning of the video, lions are the most social cat species. Most of them live together in so-called prides, which usually consist of about 15 and can have up to 30 members. Not all lions live in prides though. When they leave their pride, they become nomads. Most nomadic lions are males, traveling alone
or in pairs. Sometimes females become nomadic too however. On average they spend several years as nomads, before they join another pride, or establish
their own. Male lions normally defend the pride’s territory, while the females do most of the hunting. The lion is called the “king of the jungle”, although they live in grasslands and plains. That title might have originated from an incorrect association between Africa and jungles. Today all lion subspecies are endangered, due to poaching and the expansion of human
civilization. The total number has halved compared to 25
years ago, with less than 25,000 remaining in Africa and only around 600 in India, isolated in
just one national park. Co-existing with large predators such as lions
is difficult for villagers, especially if they cannot afford the means
to keep them away. The easiest way for them is simply to shoot
them. Driving down these costs and providing more education about these animals is an essential key to protect these endangered
species. If done right, villagers manage to co-exist
next to these large cats just fine, and might even become lions’ guardians against
poachers. So here we go. A leaping lioness, probably hunting her prey. A very dynamic pose, with the hind legs stretched
out from the jump, and the front legs reaching out, ready to
catch their target. I chose to use back lighting, just for extra
dramatic effect. From this angle you are also able to see the
underside of her front paw. The paw pads are quite large, and usually
have a dark color. A simple way to draw the feet is to use ovals
within ovals. At first to sketch out the orientation of
the toe, and then for the paw pad. The biggest one in the middle has a more complicated
shape, but you can maybe imagine an extremely fat
“M” shape, if that makes sense. If you want to draw the mouth open, draw at first some kind of “S” curve down
towards the mouth corner. From there you abruptly change the direction, following the jaw, and slightly curve up at
the front. Their canines are huge, sitting in their own
kind of mounds. These plus the incisors at the front are the first teeth to show up when they open
their mouths. Alright, I have a third drawing for you. And that one doesn’t just have one lion,
but a whole small family! Here it is! A romantic sunset at the beach, featuring the pink lion from Steven Universe! Since he is a cartoon character, I drew his
face and mane in a softer way. But I made sure not to overdo it, to prevent going down too far the uncanny
valley. I thought it would be a cute idea to draw
him a partner. And as you can see, their offspring is having
fun in his magical portal mane. By the way, there will be an extra video, showing the drawing process of this picture in a timelapse, and it is going to be fully
narrated. So stay tuned, and let me tell you what the thought and work process behind this
drawing was! In case you didn’t know yet, this video is part of a tutorial series about
big cats. Tigers already have been released, and snow leopards plus cheetahs are soon to
follow. I would be extra happy if not only I successfully
motivated you to draw these beautiful cats, but also to
learn more about them! That is why I structure my tutorial videos
the way I do. Not just as mere “how to draw” videos, but I want to provide additional education and a little bit of entertainment too. Well, I hope that that extra work is not pointless. And so, let me thank you a lot for watching! As always, if you have any questions or constructive
feedback, then please leave a comment down below. And for more information and links please check out the description of this video. There is quite a lot in there. Alright then, have fun drawing!

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