Lines. What I just learned

Lines. What I just learned


– Hey everyone, it’s
Nicholas Wilton at Art2Life, and I’m in the middle of
working on this painting here. So I thought I’d stop and just share what was happening. One of the things that I’m
starting to do more and more is, you know, when the thing’s
just not working at all, and there’s, it’s
incoherent, I’m using pencil and crayon and oil pastel and
just lines and just drawing and literally connecting things randomly. You know, like, if you take
a painting that’s not working and scramble it, you know, just
having drawing on top of it, and it connects it ’cause
there’s lines visiting all these places. One of the things that,
you know, I struggle with is getting the thing to
feel like all the parts are part of a bigger thing and, you know, you can do
that with value and design. You can do that with color, but this is kind of cool, like using line to actually
visually visit all these places. It’s something I’ve been kind of doing in the early stages of my painting kind of over and over again. And also, when you’re
doing this, your marks and your movements are really, really big because you’re covering huge areas. I mean, you know, it takes
a lot of time and effort to cover, you know, half
of this picture with blue, but you can get a same feeling of scale with line by driving all the way across and all the way down. Like those marks, you
can feel it, you know, when you look at the picture, it brings in a sense that you have visited like there’s a history,
which is in contrast to the smaller, kind
of like, littler areas and little shapes and little color things that are being revealed, which I do a lot. So this is a really nice complement to those smaller kind of chunks. That’s kind of cool, I think, and what I also realize
is that, it’s really easy to overdo this. In fact, I like doing that. Like I just do way more. It’s really fun, and I
can go overboard with it, but then I can come back
in as I’ve done here, and it’s all kind of running, so it’s not really looking that good but I can cover up parts of these lines and other things that were, you know, the line puts everything on one plane. It puts it behind it. If that line’s going everywhere, then all of the shapes are behind it. And it organizes your picture. It’s like, well there’s the line and then there’s all
this stuff that obviously is behind that line. So and then when you coming
in and you’re breaking it, you get this really great
interruption of the line but that background is now coming forward of the line, and, but we
still have the feeling of that scale and that
reckless abandonment in the work even though it
doesn’t feel reckless now ’cause we’ve gotten rid
of a lot of the lines, but these lines, that has
a direction and a purpose, that line. Like it’s different if you
just make a mark like this, a smaller, like you’re thinking smaller, but when it’s part of a bigger arc, even just seeing a piece of it, it has this bigness to it and I think that’s a really
interesting thing to remember. This is kinda what I’m realizing. That to have these residual lines in it, and now I can make them
just be on different layers and you can build it up and
I’m still working on this, but I think it’s just
a, it’s a powerful thing to like, you know, not to fake it, but to actually draw at scale, at a different scale, it’s a completely
different mode of working that is recorded on the panel. Then, you come back to
your traditional way of working and covering
it up or however you wanna work with it. And even remnants of it
will give you that other dimension, that scaling without painting the half
of this thing blue or red. Like it could be really delicate, but do you have a sense
of scale at the same time, you’re not using shape to do it. So, this is kind of a
interesting thing for me, and I just thought I would kinda share that because this is, from a distance, I like what’s happening here. I like the broken up little parts, and how, you know, like you would never, I would never come up
with that kind of line, but it happens because I’m covering and there’s just remnants are being shown. Just like when you cover up the foreground or a background, you get marks that you wouldn’t normally make. So it’s just all about bringing
these different things in, these different ways, these
different experiences, these different feelings of scale, of direction, of large,
purposeful mark making with more conservative, quiet mark making. And mixing those all together. Anyway, I hope that
makes some sense for you. I’d love to know your thoughts on that, and line for me is just
something that I’m really excited about, and I’m gonna
be sort of using that I think more and more, so I’d love
to hear how this shows up in your work. I hope this Sunday’s going great for you, and if you’re new here, and you wanna click on the link below, you can get my free color PDF, you know, all the tips
on like color and stuff. Some of the ways that I work, you know, I use color and teach it, so there’s some really
good stuff in there. Anyway, thanks a lot. Okay.

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